HIV/AIDS Skepticism

Pointing to evidence that HIV is not the necessary and sufficient cause of AIDS

Archive for the ‘experts’ Category

Vaccines: The good, the bad, and the ugly

Posted by Henry Bauer on 2017/05/21

Only in recent years have I begun to wonder whether there are reasons not to follow official recommendations about vaccination. In the 1930s, I had the then-usual vaccinations, including (in Austria, perhaps Europe) against smallpox. A few others in later years when I traveled quite a bit.

But the Andrew Wakefield affair *, and the introduction of Gardasil **, showed me that official sources had become as untrustworethy about vaccines as they have become about prescription drugs.

It seems that Big Pharma had just about run out of new diseases to invent against which to create drugs and had turned to snake-oil-marketing of vaccines. We are told, for example, that 1 in 3 people will experience shingles in their lifetime and should get vaccinated against it. Have one in three of your aged friends ever had shingles? Not among my family and friends. One of my buddies got himself vaccinated, and came down with shingles a couple of weeks later. His physician asserted that the attack would have been more severe if he hadn’t been vaccinated — no need for a control experiment, or any need to doubt official claims.

So it’s remarkable that the Swedish Government has resisted attempts to make vaccinations compulsory (“Sweden bans mandatory vaccinations over ‘serious health concerns’” by Baxter Dmitry, 12 May 2017).

That article includes extracts from an interview of Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., on the Tucker Carlson Show, which included such tidbits as the continued presence of thimerosal (organic mercury compound) in many vaccines including the seasonal flu vaccines that everyone is urged to get; and the huge increase in number of things against which vaccination is being recommended:

“I got three vaccines and I was fully compliant. I’m 63 years old. My children got 69 doses of 16 vaccines to be compliant. And a lot of these vaccines aren’t even for communicable diseases. Like Hepatitis B, which comes from unprotected sex, or using or sharing needles – why do we give that to a child on the first day of their life? And it was loaded with mercury.”

 

————————————————–

“Autism and Vaccines: Can there be a final unequivocal answer?”
      “YES: Thimerosal CAN induce autism”

** See “Gardasil and Cervarix: Vaccination insanity” and many other posts recovered with SEARCH for “Gardasil” on my blogs: https://scimedskeptic.wordpress.com/?s=gardasil and https://hivskeptic.wordpress.com/?s=gardasil

Posted in consensus, experts, Legal aspects, unwarranted dogmatism in science, vaccines | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Quality of life when diagnosed HIV+ or AIDS

Posted by Henry Bauer on 2017/05/20

An obscure publication from Universidad Juan Agustín Maza (in Argentina) came to my attention via Research Gate:

“Iniciativas para mejorar la calidad de vida de personas con VIH positivo y SIDA: Revisión del Diagnóstico, el Pronóstico y la Terapéutica a la luz de la Ciencia y de la Ética” by M. E. Molina, J. Abou Medelej, S. Perez Daffunchio, D. E. Crisafulli & J. Álvarez.
[Initiatives to improve the quality of life of HIV-positive and AIDS-diagnosed patients: A review of diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy from viewpoints of science and ethics]

The full article is in Spanish with an Abstract in English:
“The first cases of AIDS occurred in 1981. There are not fully appropriate therapeutic interventions for treating this medical condition yet. People who are diagnosed with positive HIV or AIDS suffer a poor quality of life and receive medication that produces severe adverse reactions. The purposes of this investigation are: * To review the existent reports on the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of HIV. * To bring the affected people updated information for healthcare and improvement of their quality of life. We have analyzed a significant number of papers published in several countries on these topics, and we have found the following inconsistencies: * HIV risk behaviors: According to the CDC in the United States, the Estimated Per-Act Probability of Acquiring HIV from an Infected Source, by Exposure Act (heterosexual) is about one in one thousand for woman, and about one on two thousands for man. Nevertheless, an investigation conducted through the University of San Francisco, California, on 442 discordant heterosexual couples no seroconversion was observed throughout the ten years the research lasted. (1985-1995). * Diagnostics methods: In Argentina, we employ the ELISA screening method, posteriorly confirmed by a western blot test, but in the United Stated this last is discouraged since 2014. * Medication: The drugs that are used to treat HIV are DNA chain terminators which interfere with the normal functioning and replication of normal cells. As a result, damage in the immune system and the mitochondrial DNA are reported. We wonder what should we inform the patients and people in general about all these. We require the experts´ opinion on the ethical management aspects. Due that the diagnostic tests employed may result in false positives, and the fact that the medication is highly toxic, we recommend that patients with HIV positive diagnosis re-test their condition at least once a year”.

This all seems quite sound, but after citing false positives, no sexual transmission, and the toxicity of ARVs the last sentence is quite a let-down.

The mention of vaccines is also a mixture of sound and doubtful:[Google translation]:
Regarding the possible development of vaccines.
The difficulty in developing vaccines due to HIV mutation has been explained: the high coding error rate produced by the reverse transcriptase enzyme and the recombination of various phenotypes of HIV in the DNA of infected cells (Montagnier L., 2008). However, other retroviruses that respond to the same replication mechanisms do not produce mutations that impede the development of vaccines. Example: Murine Leukemia Virus. Likewise, a purification of up to 20% of HIV has not been reported to date, so doubts remain about the specificity of antibodies used in diagnosis (Leung, Hans Gelderblom Extended Interview min 37.48) , 2011”

Evidently the authors accept HIV/AIDS theory but are puzzled by its internal contradictions.

 

Posted in antiretroviral drugs, experts, HIV tests, HIV transmission, Legal aspects, sexual transmission, vaccines | Tagged: | 2 Comments »

Superstitious belief in science

Posted by Henry Bauer on 2017/05/16

Rethinkers have surely been perpetually astonished that so much clear evidence, almost all of it published in mainstream journals and reports, demonstrates that HIV is not the cause of AIDS; and yet official authorities and mainstream media, technical as well as popular, continue to uphold the myths of HIV/AIDS theory.

An underlying culprit is the unthinking obeisance paid to “science”: not to the evidence itself, the real science, but to what supposedly authoritative voices say. Few people other than academic specialists know how drastically scientific activity has changed over about the last half-a-century, making it much more an accessory of commerce and power than an independent truth-seeking enterprise, which latter remains the widespread popular view. But dramatic changes in how science is done, especially since mid-20th century, make it less trustworthy than earlier.

The hegemony of HIV/AIDS theory is unlikely to end until science as a whole is treated more skeptically and less superstitiously.

In 1987, historian John Burnham had published How Superstition Won and Science Lost, arguing that modern science had not vanquished popular superstition by inculcating scientific, evidence-based thinking; rather, science had itself become on worldly matters the accepted authority whose pronouncements are believed without question, in other words superstitiously, by society at large.

Burnham argued through detailed analysis of how science is popularized, and especially how that has changed over the decades. Some 30 years later, Burnham’s insight is perhaps even more important. Over those years, certain changes in scientific activity have also become evident that support Burnham’s conclusion from different directions: science has grown so much, and has become so specialized and bureaucratic and so dependent on outside patronage, that it has lost any ability to self-correct. As with religion in medieval times, official pronouncements about science are usually accepted without further ado, and minority voices of dissent are dismissed and denigrated.

A full discussion with source references, far too long for a blog post, is available here.

Posted in consensus, experts, scientific literacy, unwarranted dogmatism in science | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

HIV infectivity: high, low, or non-existent?

Posted by Henry Bauer on 2016/07/31

Analysis of essentially all published results of HIV tests in the USA reveals properties unlike those of an infectious agent (The Origin, Persistence and Failings of HIV/AIDS Theory, McFarland 2007).  In every social sector, the same regularities are seen: rates of testing positive vary by US official “racial” and ethnic classification (black >> native American > Caucasian > Asian); rates of testing positive decrease drastically from birth into the teens and increase from the late teens into middle age and then decline again; in early teens, females are more likely to be HIV+ than are males but by the 20s that is reversed (see references cited in section 3.3.5 in The Case against HIV).

In cloned HIV virions, only between 1 in 10,000 and 1 in 10 million were infectious (Layne et al., “Factors underlying spontaneous inactivation and susceptibility to neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus”, Virology, 189 (1992) 695-714).

The instructions that come with HIV test kits warn that a positive test is not proof of infection.

Innumerable conditions produce HIV+ results (see references cited in section 3.2 in The Case against HIV), so all claims to have measured infectivity or transmission are at best dubious and at worst — or more accurately — meaningless. There is no valid published evidence of transmission or infectivity (see references cited in section 3.3 in The Case against HIV). The Office of Medical and Scientific Justice successfully defended more than 50 individuals http://www.omsj.org/human-rights/52nd charged with transmitting HIV because the prosecution could not prove HIV to be transmissible.

Researching phantoms

It can take a long time before researchers realize that they have been on a wild-goose chase, pursuing phantoms (“Phantom phantoms”, pp. 110-116 in Fatal Attractions: The Troubles with Science, Paraview Press 2001); even “an unknown phenomenon [that] towered 6 standard deviations above the mundane background of known physics — enough to satisfy a 99.9999% confidence level that it wasn’t a fluke” and that had been reported in more than a dozen experiments turned out to be non-existent.

Given that HIV/AIDS theory is wrong (The Case against HIV), observations and experiments and clinical trials will continually throw up what seem to be conundrums, which serve as the basis for yet more research. To date, mainstream HIV/AIDS researchers have failed to recognize the accumulation of conundrums and absurdities  as being in reality the hard evidence that HIV/AIDS theory is simply wrong: HIV is not infectious, and “HIV” doesn’t cause AIDS.

Mainstream science sticks to theories that had once been accepted by ignoring anomalies, conundrums, absurdities for as long as possible (Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, University of Chicago Press 1970 [2nd ed., enlarged; 1st ed. was 1962]). Things that don’t fit an existing theory are accommodated by ad hoc adjustments (Imre Lakatos, “History of science and its rational reconstruction”, pp. 1-40 in Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences, ed. Colin Howson, Cambridge University Press 1976), just as Ptolemy long maintained belief in the circular perfection of heavenly motions by adding epicycles upon epicycles, wheels within wheels, to avoid acknowledging that the movements are not really circular after all.

So too HIV/AIDS researchers create new hypotheses to bolster their belief whenever they seem unable to explain what they observe. Since all the data point to HIV not being infective, or being apparently infective to so low a degree as to be incapable of producing an epidemic, auxiliary hypotheses were suggested which have become accepted as shibboleths:

  1. The epidemic in Africa is said to have come about because of an incredible rate of promiscuity. Sexually active South Africans (black South Africans, that is) are postulated to have an average of 10 sexual partners at any give time and to change them about annually (pp. 63-65 in James Chin, The AIDS Pandemic, Radcliffe 2007).
  2. Soon after initial infection, there is an “acute phase” where large amounts of HIV are present, and intercourse during that phase makes transmission much more likely: infectivity is very high during these short periods, so overall measurements of transmissibility are deceiving.

The first suggestion is absurd, since such behavior would be so visibly evident that it could not be overlooked; yet it is not observed.

The second suggestion has been undermined by a careful re-analysis of the single study on which it had been based: the “excess hazard-months attributable to the acute phase of infection” is about 5.3, not the previously estimated 31-to-141 (Bellan et al., “Reassessment of HIV-1 acute phase infectivity: accounting for heterogeneity and study design with simulated cohorts”, PLoS Medicine, 12(3):  e1001801).

HIV/AIDS research is chasing red herrings, phantoms, in a decades-long wild-goose change that has been enormously expensive in lives and in dollars. But the interests vested in this state of affairs — drug-company profits, research careers, administrative careers, honors and awards — are so widespread and powerful that the actual evidence is given little or no chance of speaking for itself. Try to imagine what it would take for Anthony Fauci to shed cognitive dissonance and admit that he has been so disastrously wrong.

 

Posted in clinical trials, experts, HIV absurdities, HIV and race, HIV does not cause AIDS, HIV tests, HIV transmission, HIV varies with age, HIV/AIDS numbers, Legal aspects, M/F ratios | Tagged: , | 16 Comments »

Who can be trusted about science? Not the Royal Society of London or the National Academy of the United States

Posted by Henry Bauer on 2016/01/02

Those of us who have bothered to look into the evidence about HIV and about AIDS know that the mainstream dogma, that HIV causes AIDS, has no credible evidence in its favor; and that prestigious and authoritative institutions and organizations persistently disseminate the false belief and try to suppress the evidence and those who present it. The most obvious disproof of HIV=AIDS is that HIV is incapable of causing any sort of epidemic because it is not sufficiently transmissible, less than 1 per 1000 acts of unprotected intercourse (and only 1.4 per 1000 acts of unprotected receptive anal intercourse, supposedly the most risky).

At the Rethinking AIDS Conference in Oakland,  I had pointed out that this resistance to contrary evidence is unfortunately not uncommon, it is evident on a variety of topics; see also my book, Dogmatism in Science and Medicine: How Dominant Theories Monopolize Research and Stifle the Search for Truth (McFarland 2012).

One topic on which mainstream dogmatism contrary to evidence is most pronounced is global warming and climate change: do human activities contribute appreciably to these phenomena, outweighing natural forces? The evidence says no, or at least there is no empirical proof of it. Nevertheless, all mainstream groups insist that the science is settled — and that includes the Royal Society of London and the National Academy of Science of the United States, which mislead disgracefully on this topic.

 

Posted in experts, uncritical media | Tagged: , , , | 20 Comments »